September 23, 2014

The American Indian College Fund is hosting an event in Chicago, Illinois September 30, 2014 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. featuring Dr. Verna Fowler, President of the College of Menominee Nation in Wisconsin and a ground-breaking innovator in Native higher education, will speak at the event. Dr. Fowler has worked in education since 1964, teaching everything from grade school to adult education and serving an education administrator. Twenty-one years ago, she established the College of Menominee Nation. As an advocate for education for Native Americans, Dr. Fowler was appointed to the White House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities in 1999 by President Bill Clinton and again in 2006 by President George W. Bush. She has served as a trustee for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association, Land Grant Colleges USDA Leadership Committee, American Indian Higher Education Consortium, and the American Indian College Fund.

Tribal college students will also be in attendance to share how their education experience has inspired change in their lives and communities.

Verna Fowler The event will be held at The Drake Hotel – Parkside Room, 140 East Walton Place, in Chicago. Appetizers and cocktails will be served. Please RSVP by September 23, 2014 to Mari Putney at MPutney@collegefund.org or 303-430-5357.


Dr. Fowler has served in the field of education since 1964. She has taught everything from grade school to adult education and has also worked as an education administrator. Twenty-one years ago, she established the College of Menominee Nation, which operates its main campus in Keshena, WI and its urban campus in Green Bay, WI. As an advocate for education for Native Americans, Dr. Fowler was appointed to the White House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities in 1999 by President Bill Clinton and again in 2006 by President George W. Bush. Furthermore, she has served as a trustee for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association, Land Grant Colleges USDA Leadership Committee, American Indian Higher Education Consortium, and the American Indian College Fund.


Student: Appolonia traditional dancingAppolonia is an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation. In June, she received an Associate of Arts and Science in Biological and Physical Sciences and is currently pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Mathematics at the College of Menominee Nation. She is working towards a future in engineering. Appolonia is a lifetime learner that enjoys traveling and studying Spanish.