Making Good on a Promise for the Next Generation

Apr 25, 2024 | Indigenous Adult Education

By Arin Davis, LCOOU GED/HSED Coordinator

Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe University, through support and partnership with organizations such as the American Indian College Fund, provides a comprehensive adult education program at the university. The program is free to anyone and is also available at multiple tribal outreach sites in northern Wisconsin. Roberta Miller, a community member, obtained her high school diploma this year through hard work after enrolling in LCOOU’s high school equivalency diploma (HSED) program pathway. The program is based on competency rather than tests, and allows students to obtain their HSED by completing relevant coursework.

Roberta grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. At age 16, she was a young teenage mother needing to care for her first son and dropped out of high school. With little help or support from others, she raised three young boys in Milwaukee. The environment was very difficult, and she was concerned with violence and gang influences in her local community, so in 1999 she moved to the LCO community near Hayward, Wisconsin. Roberta promised herself that someday she would return to school to get her diploma.

Roberta made good on her promise and at age 51, she received her high school diploma through hard work, dedication, and instruction at LCOOU. Her sons are now grown men and she is a proud grandmother.

Roberta’s commitment to obtaining her diploma is just one example of who she is as a role model and support to her children and grandchildren. The photos show Roberta’s beadwork in progress for two of her granddaughters. The first image is a flower pattern for her oldest granddaughter, Zaagi’s medicine bag. The second image is a regalia head band for a granddaughter, Amillie. Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe University is proud to support adult learners like Roberta and her family in the community.

 

Roberta's Headband Beading in Progress

Roberta’s Headband Beading in Progress

Roberta's Medicine Bag Design

Roberta’s Medicine Bag Design

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