Blog Articles

American Indian College Fund and Pendleton Woolen Mills Student Blanket Contest Opens November 15

The American Indian College Fund and Pendleton Woolen Mills, the international lifestyle brand headquartered in Portland, Oregon, are announcing they are accepting submissions for The Tribal College Blanket Design Contest beginning November 15. All American Indian and Alaska Native students attending a tribal college or university are eligible to submit one or several designs in the competition, which awards scholarships and cash prizes to the top three designers.

Back-to-School

Back-to-School

Cheryl Crazy Bull, CEO and President of the American Indian College Fund shares how important tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) are and how critical it is for mainstream institutions to have support readily available for Native students.

read more
Culture is Not a Costume

Culture is Not a Costume

A guest post from Heidi K. Brandow (Diné, Kanaka Maoli), Communications Manager at First Peoples Fund. As the fall season conjures memories of vivid colors, pumpkin-spiced lattes, and celebrations such as Halloween, we ask the public to refrain from participating in racist and inaccurate portrayals of Indigenous people through “Native American” themed costumes. These practices in no way honor Indigenous people but rather reinforce false narratives and dehumanize Indigenous people into caricatures.

read more
Join the American Indian College Fund in Support of the Indian Child Welfare Act:  Vital to Native Culture, Identity, and Sovereignty

Join the American Indian College Fund in Support of the Indian Child Welfare Act: Vital to Native Culture, Identity, and Sovereignty

On November 9, the United States Supreme Court will hear oral arguments of Haaland v. Brackeen, the case concerning the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). The stakes are high. The Supreme Court’s decision will ultimately determine whether the 44-year-old law that ensures Native children have the legal right to remain connected to their familial network, culture, and community will remain intact.

read more