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Dina Horwedel, Director of Public Education, American Indian College Fund
303-426-8900, dhorwedel@collegefund.org

Colleen R. Billiot, Public Education Coordinator, American Indian College Fund
720-214-2569, cbilliot@collegefund.org

Apr 17, 2024 | Press Releases

American Indian College Fund President Cheryl Crazy Bull Contributing Writer to Book Honoring Legacy of Vine Deloria, Jr.

Of Living Stone: Perspectives on Continuous Knowledge and the Work of Vine Deloria, Jr. Available from Fulcrum Press

April 18, 2024, Denver, Colo.— Cheryl Crazy Bull (Sicangu Lakota), President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, is one of several noteworthy contributors in Indian Country whose work appears in a new collection of essays about one of the most influential thinkers of our time. Of Living Stone: Perspectives on Continuous Knowledge and the Work of Vine Deloria, Jr. features more than 30 original pieces by Tribal leaders, artists, scientists, activists, scholars, legal experts, and humorists in tribute of about Deloria, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.

Time magazine named Vine Deloria, Jr. as one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century. His research, writings, and teachings on history, law, religion, and science continue to influence generations of Indigenous peoples and their allies across the world. He authored many acclaimed books, including God Is Red; The Nations Within (with Clifford Lytle); Red Earth, White Lies; Spirit and Reason; and Custer Died for Your Sins. 

Readers will find thoughtful and creative views on his wide-ranging and world-changing body of work that was designed to center the traditional exercise of continuous knowledge by sharing, considering, and pragmatically adapting information as it flows between generations. To keep people, ideas, and traditions alive and relevant, the book honors the past as the past by those living in the present as they prepare for the future.

In addition to Cheryl Crazy Bull, the book includes contributions from:

  • Climate expert Margaret Redsteer (Crow)
  • Melanie Yazzie (Diné), host of The Red Power Hour podcast
  • Activists Faith Spotted Eagle (Yankton Dakota) and Lauren Schad (Cheyenne River Lakota)
  • Writer and producer Migizi Pensoneau (Ponca/Ojibwe)
  • Environmental scientists Kyle Whyte (Citizen Potawatomi) and Ryan Emanuel (Lumbee)
  • Experts on Tribal Governance Deron Marquez (Yuhaaviatam of San Manuel), Frank Ettawageshik (Little Traverse Bay), Norbert Hill (Oneida), Megan Hill (Oneida), and Marty Case.
  • Artists Cannupa Hanska Luger (MHA-Three Affiliated Tribes) and James Johnson (Tlingit)
  • Legal Scholars Sarah Deer (Muscogee), Rebecca Tsosie (Yaqui descent), and Gabe Galanda (Round Valley)
  • Archaeologist Paulette Steeves (Cree-Metis)
  • Scholars of Indigenous Traditions Noenoe Silva (Kānaka Maoli), Natalie Avalos (Chicana of Mexican Indigenous descent), Tom Holm (Cherokee), and Greg Cajete (Tewa-Santa Clara Pueblo).

To order your copy ($35.00), please visit the Fulcrum Press website at https://www.fulcrumbooks.com/product-page/of-living-stone-perspectives-on-continuous-knowledge-and-the-work-of.

About the American Indian College Fund — The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 34 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $17.4 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2022-23. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $319 million in scholarships, programs, community, and tribal college support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull (Sicangu Lakota), President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, is one of several noteworthy contributors in Indian Country whose work appears in a new collection of essays about one of the most influential thinkers of our time. Of Living Stone: Perspectives on Continuous Knowledge and the Work of Vine Deloria, Jr. features original essays in tribute of Deloria by Tribal leaders, artists, scientists, activists, scholars, legal experts, and humorists and is published by Fulcrum Press.

Journalists—The American Indian College Fund does not use the acronym AICF. On second reference, please use the College Fund.

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