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Dina Horwedel, Director of Public Education, American Indian College Fund
303-426-8900, dhorwedel@collegefund.org

Colleen R. Billiot, Public Education Coordinator, American Indian College Fund
720-214-2569, cbilliot@collegefund.org

The American Indian College Fund Announces 2023-24 Student Ambassadors

Leadership Training for Student Scholars Includes Advocacy, Marketing, and PR

August 29, 2023, Denver, Colo.— The American Indian College Fund named 11 Native students to the 2023-24 cohort of its Student Ambassador Program. Students named to the program are trained in leadership and communications skills to create greater visibility of Native Americans and generate an understanding of the importance of their diverse cultures.

With 42% of the Native American population today under the age of 24, the College Fund sees an opportunity to educate the next generation of young Native leaders to realize their potential. The 11 student ambassadors help the College Fund create greater visibility about higher education and the work the College Fund, Native students, and tribal colleges are doing to create a better future for Native peoples and communities. College Fund student ambassadors represent the College Fund and their institutions in media interviews, at cultural events, in their communities, and on their campuses.

The 2023-24 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassador cohort.

The 2023-24 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassador cohort.

The College Fund hosted a multi-day training program for the student ambassadors in Denver, Colorado. Students participated in in-person workshops for leadership development, public speaking, interviewing, writing, and social media training.

The 2023-24 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassadors include:

    • Amanda Charger (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe), Sinte Gleska University, human services major.
    • Brianna Waukau (Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin), Institute of American Indian Arts, Indigenous liberal studies major.
    • Chenoa Webster (Oneida Nation), College of Menominee Nation, elementary and middle school education major.
    • Jason Rosette (Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation), Stone Child College, elementary education major.
    • Jaylon Romine (The Muscogee [Creek] Nation), Haskell Indian Nations University, American Indian/Native American studies major.
    • Keona Hosteen (Navajo Nation), Northern Arizona University, communication disorders, major.
    • Natasha Martinez (Diné/Chiricahua Apache), Southwestern College – Santa Fe, art therapy and counseling masters.
    • Sam Lee Regan (Cherokee Nation), Princeton University, English, major.
    • Selena Romero (Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona), Northwest Indian College, human services major.
    • Sky Harper (Navajo Nation), Drexel University, chemistry major.
    • Nessa Ankney (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation), Washington State University, fine arts major.

About the American Indian College FundThe American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 33 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $14.45 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2021-22. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $284 million in scholarships, programs, community, and tribal college support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Photo: The 2023-24 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassador cohort.

Left to right: Natasha Martinez (Diné/Chiricahua Apache), Keona Hosteen (Navajo Nation), Selena Romero (Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona), Amanda Charger (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe), Sky Harper (Navajo Nation), Sam Lee Regan (Cherokee Nation), Chenoa Webster (Oneida Nation), Nessa Ankney (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation), Brianna Waukau (Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin), Jason Rosette (Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation), and Jaylon Romine (The Muscogee [Creek] Nation).

JournalistsThe American Indian College Fund does not use the acronym AICF. On second reference, please use the College Fund.

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