Native student intern bloggers sought for summer!

May 10, 2011 | Archives, Blog

Are you a Native student working at an internship this summer? What: You will be paid $10 per blog entry during the summer (5 entries per week at $50).

The entries must be a minimum of three paragraphs and relevant to what you are learning on your internship. Topics for the blogs include but are not limited to:
• Working in a professional setting
• The topic of your internship
• Confidence
• Teamwork with colleagues
• How the internship will prepare you for your future career
• Photographs of you
• Your tribal background and your experiences as a Native student and intern

Where: The blog will be published on our web site at aicf.nmcstaging.com Excerpts will also be used for newsletter stories and social media stories to generate interest for other students in internships, and they will be shared with our donors.

When: Entries accepted beginning May 31-September 1.

The fine print: We reserve the right to edit content for grammar and style or to refuse content. Please send a sample blog entry to the following e-mail address. Two bloggers will be chosen for a duration of six weeks each for the summer.

Contact publiced@collegefund.org for more information.

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American Indian College Fund Launches “Make Native Voices Heard” Voting Campaign

American Indian College Fund Launches “Make Native Voices Heard” Voting Campaign

Native Americans are more impacted by the law than any other group in the United States. Native students in higher education, or seeking a higher education, in particular are impacted by federal and state laws impacting funding for education, such as Pell Grants, student loans, and federal funding for tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), 70% of which comes from federal sources.

Support for Native People in Higher Education Includes Permitting Sharing of Tribal Affiliations

Support for Native People in Higher Education Includes Permitting Sharing of Tribal Affiliations

Employees at the University of South Dakota were told to remove tribal affiliations and gender pronouns from email signatures, citing a policy by the Board of Regents. This move lacks support for Native individuals in higher education, according to Cheryl Crazy Bull of the American Indian College Fund, who urges allies to stand with Native faculty and staff by including such details in their signatures.