Rising Fuel Costs Will Affect American Indian Education

Jun 18, 2008 | Archives, Blog

As gas prices soar to over $4 a gallon, the costs are affecting everyone. But no one is hit harder than the nation’s poorest: American Indians. With 85% unemployment on many reservations and American Indians ranking as the poorest Americans in the U.S. Census Bureau survey, they are already at an economic disadvantage. But American Indians have another disadvantage: many live in remote rural locations, and traveling to school requires that they drive long distances to attend classes. As a result, an education that was once out of reach for many is even more so.

This is why supporting the American Indian College Fund is more important than ever. As prices soar, many talented and bright American Indian students will be forced to make the choice between an education and daily necessities. But with your support, these leaders of tomorrow will have the chance to continue their education and see their dreams realized.

I’d like to thank you for your support in the past and your continued support in the future.

Recent Blog Posts

American Indian College Fund Develops Transfer Data Guidebook for TCUs

American Indian College Fund Develops Transfer Data Guidebook for TCUs

The American Indian College Fund (College Fund) has published a “Transfer Data Guidebook for Tribal Colleges and Universities.” The guidebook is the culmination of three years of research conducted under a $625,000 grant from the Educational Credit Management Corporation, which examined the transfer landscape of the seven Montana tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to improve student achievement by creating a cohesive transfer system.

American Indian College Fund Partners with Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies to Enhance Native Arts Programs

American Indian College Fund Partners with Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies to Enhance Native Arts Programs

The American Indian College Fund (College Fund) announced new efforts to enhance Native arts curriculum development programs at six tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). Each of the participating TCUs will receive $100,000 to enrich their curricula by integrating Indigenous education values and incorporate Native knowledge, language, and cultural practices. The project will also help to expand institutional capacity, developing or revising academic courses, minors, and certificate and degree programs.