Third Time Four-Star Rating from Charity Navigator Makes American Indian College Fund Wise Investment for Donors

May 2, 2012 | Archives, Blog

When Charity Navigator, the nation’s top charity evaluation system, awarded the American Indian College Fund (the Fund) a coveted four-star rating for sound fiscal management and transparency, it was our third consecutive four-star rating. It was also no surprise to those that work at the American Indian College Fund.

Charity Navigator applies data-driven analysis to the charitable sector to evaluate charities’ effectiveness, then publishes that data on its web site to help donors evaluate their giving choices using information Charity Navigator gathers to form a picture of a charity’s accountability, governance, transparency, and quantifiable results with their recipients, which reflect how it executes its mission in a fiscally responsible way.

The Fund’s Board of Trustees and its staff work tirelessly to make decisions that best benefit the communities the Fund serves—while ensuring that the organization’s donors know that it is an organization that is financially sound, is a good steward of monies entrusted to it, and makes wise decisions regarding its investments and disbursements.

We work hard because we know our students and our tribal colleges count on us. We also work hard because we know you deserve to know that your investment in American Indian education is a wise one.

Thank you for your commitment to American Indian education and your trust in the American Indian College Fund.

See Charity Navigator’s review of the American Indian College Fund here.

 

 

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