RX FOR HEALING IN INDIAN COUNTRY: CULTURAL COMPETENCY

Jun 13, 2019 | Blog, Inside the College Fund, Our Programs

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A scholar from another organization at the forum standing to posing for photo

(from left) A scholar from another organization at the forum, Carlene Black, Danelle Cooper, and Kaira Begay pose in front of the U.S. Capitol.

Participants learned about the importance of culturally competent representation in health care, preparing for their careers, and improving health care in the communities they plan to serve. In addition to scholarship funding, the scholars receive internship and mentoring opportunities and support services to ensure their academic and career success in health care.

Learn more about the United Health Foundation’s Diverse Scholars Initiative.

Research has shown that Native Americans enjoy better health outcomes when they are served by health care providers that are steeped both in their cultures and western medicine. Ten American Indian College Fund scholars studying health care fields attended the United Health Foundation’s Diverse Scholars Initiative program last week in Washington, D.C.

Alexandra Darling of the American Indian College Fund with the College Fund’s participants in the United Health Foundation’s Diverse Scholars program. They are posing for group photo

(from left) Alexandra Darling of the American Indian College Fund with the College Fund’s participants in the United Health Foundation’s Diverse Scholars program, including Elayna Locklear, Valene Talks Different, Kaira Begay, Latoya Delorme, Jalisa Whitehorse, Maria Vormestrand, Trista Jetty, Carlene Black, and Dr. Cynthia Lindquist of Candeska Cikana Community College.

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