We Are the Number One Indian Education Charity in American

Apr 14, 2008 | Archives, Blog

Last week we spent close to three days in brainstorming sessions with a direct mail team to strategize for new direct mail concepts to educate the public about our organization, our mission, and our students. As part of that session, we had the opportunity to hear the results of an extensive phone survey that we commissioned on behalf of the Fund to learn more about our constituents’ perceptions of us.

We learned that in your eyes, and those of our other supporters, we are the number one Indian education charity in America. And for that, we thank you. It is because of your support and your commitment in our endeavors that we are there. You believe in the opportunity for Indian people to better their lives through education.

You believe in the transformative power of education to lift people out of poverty.

And you believe in how education has a ricochet effect, impacting others in a student’s family, community, reservation, and state.

Graduation is just around the corner, and a new group of students will be leaving college to begin new careers, or to move forward professionally in their current ones. Thanks to your beliefs in the power of a tribal college education, this new group of graduates will be embracing a promising future.

Thank you for your past, present, and future support, and thank you for making us the number one Indian education charity in America today. We are humbled by your trust, and our commitment is stronger than ever to continue our mission and calling–in a good way.

Recent Blog Posts

May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust Partners with American Indian College Fund to Support Native Student Veterans

May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust Partners with American Indian College Fund to Support Native Student Veterans

The American Indian College Fund (College Fund) has received a $50,000 grant from the May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust to implement a six-month fellowship focused on empowering Native student veterans to success. The Naabaahii Ółta’í (Student Warrior): Native Student Veterans Peer-to-Peer Program is a mentorship opportunity that builds relationships between veterans based upon their shared experiences.

American Indian College Fund Launches “Make Native Voices Heard” Voting Campaign

American Indian College Fund Launches “Make Native Voices Heard” Voting Campaign

Native Americans are more impacted by the law than any other group in the United States. Native students in higher education, or seeking a higher education, in particular are impacted by federal and state laws impacting funding for education, such as Pell Grants, student loans, and federal funding for tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), 70% of which comes from federal sources.

Support for Native People in Higher Education Includes Permitting Sharing of Tribal Affiliations

Support for Native People in Higher Education Includes Permitting Sharing of Tribal Affiliations

Employees at the University of South Dakota were told to remove tribal affiliations and gender pronouns from email signatures, citing a policy by the Board of Regents. This move lacks support for Native individuals in higher education, according to Cheryl Crazy Bull of the American Indian College Fund, who urges allies to stand with Native faculty and staff by including such details in their signatures.