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Dina Horwedel, Director of Public Education, American Indian College Fund
303-426-8900, dhorwedel@collegefund.org

Colleen R. Billiot, Public Education Coordinator, American Indian College Fund
720-214-2569, cbilliot@collegefund.org

Apr 4, 2023 | College Fund, Press Releases

American Indian College Fund Receives $100,000 Investment for Future Energy Professionals Project

Funding and Support Services will be Provided to Native Students Pursuing Post-Secondary Credentials in Energy Fields

Denver, Colo.—April 4, 2023—Marathon Petroleum contributed $100,000 to the American Indian College Fund’s (College Fund) Future Energy Professionals Project to provide scholarships and academic and career services to Native college students pursuing post-secondary credentials at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) in New Mexico and North Dakota. The focus of the program is on students who plan to enter energy fields, where Native people are underrepresented.

The Future Energy Professionals Project will recruit outstanding Native scholars, provide financial awards, and empower students to achieve success and serve as leaders in their communities. An external panel of Native education, business, and community leaders with a unique understanding of Native communities will help to review program applicants from Navajo Technical University, Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, and United Tribes Technical College. Six scholars will receive scholarships to assist them with their education goals. Selected scholars will also have access to direct and virtual support resources, including an online mentoring program, a career-focused education planning system, student success and career coaching, and additional funding opportunities.

“Energy production and management of our natural resources are among the most critical issues faced by Indigenous people today,” said Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund. “One way for us to contribute to and influence decisions surrounding resources is for us to be well-educated and employed with energy and environmental companies. This partnership among tribal colleges and universities, the College Fund, and Marathon Petroleum provides a path to energy education and employment. We are excited for our students and for the contributions that they will make with their knowledge.”

The scholarships are renewable, and the College Fund will monitor program scholars’ progress to promote retention and graduation. The College Fund will host a meet and greet between Marathon Petroleum and program scholars and will work with Marathon Petroleum to develop a curriculum, site visits, and opportunities for engagement with scholars.

“One of our core values at Marathon is collaboration and actively partnering with stakeholders with unique perspectives that drive positive impact. The Indigenous people’s perspective is unique and welcomed,” said Robert Doore, enrolled member of Blackfeet Nation and Principal Stakeholder Engagement Representative at Marathon Petroleum. “We are excited to partner with the College Fund as this partnership allows us to learn from each other and make a positive impact, while embedding sustainability and creating a more diverse workforce.”

### About Marathon Petroleum Corporation
MPC is a leading, integrated, downstream energy company headquartered in Findlay, Ohio. The company operates the nation’s largest refining system. MPC’s marketing system includes branded locations across the United States, including Marathon brand retail outlets. MPC also owns the general partner and majority limited partner interest in MPLX LP, a midstream company that owns and operates gathering, processing, and fractionation assets, as well as crude oil and light product transportation and logistics infrastructure. More information is available at www.marathonpetroleum.com.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 33 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $14.45 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2021-22. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $284 million in scholarships, programs, community, and tribal college support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Journalists: The American Indian College Fund does not use the acronym AICF. On second reference, please use the College Fund.

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