Career Advice — Thank You Letters

Dec 1, 2017 | Blog, Student Success

Writing a thank-you letter after a job interview will help you stand out from other candidates. Use the following guidelines to confirm your interest in the position after your interview:

  • Address the letter to the person(s) with whom you interviewed. Ask for your interviewers’ business cards, or write down their titles and the proper spelling of their names before leaving the interview.
  • Prepare your letter on high-quality paper using a business letter format.
  • Mail your letter in a matching envelope within 24-48 hours following the interview.
  • If your handwriting is legible, you may also choose to use a high quality, thank-you card and hand write your note.
  • If you have previously corresponded with the employer by email, it is acceptable to send your note via email.
  • Keep your letter brief and concise. Mention the date of your interview and your interest in the position and organization.
  • Reiterate your most important skills and qualifications, how you expect to contribute to the organization, and any unique points of interest discussed during the interview.
  • Express your appreciation for the opportunity to interview, tour the facilities, meet other employees, and confirm follow-up procedures. Leave no doubt in the interviewer’s mind about your enthusiasm for the position.
  • A few weeks after your interview, give the hiring manager a pleasant nudge to keep yourself top-of-mind. If you are connected to voicemail, leave the following information in your voicemail:
    • Name (twice)
    • Phone number (twice, slowly)
    • Reminder that you recently interviewed and/or previously interacted
    • Upbeat message
    • A pleasant reiteration of your interest
    • A graceful exit

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