Elder’s Dinner Draws 200 Native Elders

Dec 15, 2009 | Blog, Inside the College Fund

Panoramic view of the Elders Dinner.

Panoramic view of the Elders Dinner.

Denver, Colo. – The Denver-based American Indian College Fund (the Fund) honored 200 American Indian elders in the Denver community at a holiday dinner on December 15 at the Church of All Saints.

In American Indian tradition, “Elders are highly esteemed for their direction and are considered to be sacred,” says Richard B. Williams, President and CEO of the Fund. The Fund first began hosting dinners for the elder community when there were no services for American Indian elders, and the tradition continued. This year is the ninth annual dinner. John Gritts served as emcee for the evening and an army of volunteers from the American Indian College Fund and the community helped decorate, cook, serve meals, distribute gifts, and clean up.

The dinner included a traditional feast of buffalo, fried chicken, all the trimmings, and a dessert buffet.

An Indian Santa Claus entertained the elders and distributed gift bags, Wal-Mart gift cards, and hams.

In addition to the American Indian College Fund, community sponsors include: Annie’s Fun; CADDO; Church of All Saints; Denver Indian Health & Family Services; First Nations Development Institute; InterTribal Buffalo Cooperative; Native American Fish & Wildlife Society; Native American Rights Fund; Bruce Cassias and the Raytheon American Indian Network; Rocky Mountain Natural Meats; Sweet Tomatoes; Wal-Mart; Sonny White & Family; and Richard and Sally Williams.

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