Fund Supporter Dave Rogers Heads into the GR10, A Rough Hiking Trail in the Pyrenees, to Raise Awareness About the American Indian College Fund

Aug 22, 2011 | Blog, Inside the College Fund

The local cattle don’t like interlopers on the Pyrenees trail!

Rogers entering the Pyrenees trekking trail.

Dave Rogers has posted this photo of himself entering the wild mounts of the Ariege in the Pyrenees Mountains on the first week of his Pyrenees Challenge Trek.

Dave Rogers has posted this photo of himself entering the wild mounts of the Ariege in the Pyrenees Mountains on the first week of his Pyrenees Challenge Trek. Dave’s trip was cut short last year after bad weather and sore knees. This year he plans to finish where he left off. Dave raised $100,000 for American Indian student scholarships for the Fund last August.

“The local cattle don’t like interlopers on the Pyrenees trail,” Dave says.

The local cattle don’t like interlopers on the Pyrenees trail!

The local cattle don’t like interlopers on the Pyrenees trail!

You too can make an impact on a Native American student’s life by donating today!

Recent Blog Posts

American Indian College Fund Develops Transfer Data Guidebook for TCUs

American Indian College Fund Develops Transfer Data Guidebook for TCUs

The American Indian College Fund (College Fund) has published a “Transfer Data Guidebook for Tribal Colleges and Universities.” The guidebook is the culmination of three years of research conducted under a $625,000 grant from the Educational Credit Management Corporation, which examined the transfer landscape of the seven Montana tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to improve student achievement by creating a cohesive transfer system.

American Indian College Fund Partners with Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies to Enhance Native Arts Programs

American Indian College Fund Partners with Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies to Enhance Native Arts Programs

The American Indian College Fund (College Fund) announced new efforts to enhance Native arts curriculum development programs at six tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). Each of the participating TCUs will receive $100,000 to enrich their curricula by integrating Indigenous education values and incorporate Native knowledge, language, and cultural practices. The project will also help to expand institutional capacity, developing or revising academic courses, minors, and certificate and degree programs.